2016 Outback Challenge Medical Express

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Is it possible to send an autonomous flying robot twelve kilometers away to locate a suitable landing site, land and then return with a blood sample from a person cut off by flood waters? That was the goal in Dalby Queensland for ten international teams selected out of sixty teams all working over the past two years to develop systems to support civilain search and rescuse technology.

ProUAV owner Darrell Burkey is proud to be associated with the winning team, CanberraUAV, who managed to fly their hybrid multirotor/fixed wing plane twelve kilometers to the remote site, land safely and return with a mock blood sample. The Outback UAV Challenge is organised by Queensland University of Technology and CSIRO and run every two years.

  

Innovative Student Project

While visiting the USA recently, Darrell spent some time in Grant Nebraska (popuation 1175) where his family farmed in the 1900s. Not far from Grant is a high school student who has received a grant to build and fly the same type of mapping drones that ProUAV uses. His project has received quite a bit of attention and you will understand why by watching following news story which explains how he got started.29330832666 82177a35e7 z

 

Being in a fairly remote area has added to his challenge so Darrell dropped in to visit and offer assistance. "I was just amazed at how well Evan has researched his project and with the progress that he has made. He hopes to start a business next year to assist farmers by producing aerial maps that can identify problem areas in crops that need attention, sometimes before they are even noticable to the human eye. I have no dout that he will be quite successful" stated Darrell. We think the future is in good hands.

 

 

Australian National University AusPheno 2016 

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ProUAV has been working with ANU researchers for years. As part of the AusPheno 2016 conference we had the opportunity to fly at the ANU Kioloa coastal campus on the NSW coast. It was a fantastic opportunity to meet a lot of interesting people doing fascinating research.

 

 

 

  

InterDrone 2016 Las Vegas USA

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Developments in the UAV industry move quickly with technological improvements almost on a daily basis. There's no better place to learn from the best and meet the movers and shakers who are changing the world we live in than at the InterDrone conference held annually in Las Vegas, Nevada. ProUAV owner, Darrell Burkey, spent three days attending presentations and tutorials as part of our commitment to providing the highest quality services.

 

New Equipment

When it comes to flying cameras, using the best equipment is important for reliability and safety. Choice of camera and the equipment required to stabilise and lift the equipment is critical.

M600

We have added a DJI M600 heavy lift hexacopter combined with a Ronin MX gimbal capable of carrying up to a Red Dragon camera to our inventory.

The M600 Pro includes greater redundancy for improved reliabity and safety along with flight times of up to thirty-six minutes when flying a DJI X5 camera. It is capable of lifting up to 6.5Kg payloads. Early testing has shown it to be quite robust and a joy to fly.

 

Mapping Rural Australia

Jack Pittar, Canberra UAV pilot, and I headed out to Walgett, NSW to partner with the Dharriwaa Elders Group who are surveying areas of cultural interest. Using a flying wing equipped with a Pixhawk flight controller and Sony NEX 6 camera we managed flights up to 29 mins long capturing over 900 photos. This allowed us to produce orthomosaic maps that were 3.4 pixels/cm resolution for the DEG to merge with their land survey data.

Darrell and Jack with Skywalker X8 plane

Our road trip was great fun and I'm sure we will be doing more of this work in the future. On the way home we stopped in to meet a land owner who has 35,000 sheep and cattle to discuss how UAVs might be useful for monitoring stock.

Next month we hope to fly even further to assist a research institute with their project to monitor the water quality of a thirty-two kilometre long creek.